Also Hidden in Plain Sight

Perth Museum and Gallery

Perth Museum and Gallery

Last week Judith and I were in Perthshire for the wedding of Judith’s cousin at the remarkable Fingask Castle . The weather was perfect, the experience was magical.  And as we were staying over in the neighbourhood, we decided the next day to make a detour into Perth on our way home.

Living as I do in the Highlands, I find that Perth is often an ideal mid-point for meetings with Central Belt colleagues, either at the excellent Concert Hall, or in the very special surroundings of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society’s offices in the Fair Maid’s House. And as Perth Museum and Art Gallery is close to both those buildings, I usually try to drop in, especially as there’s almost always at least one interesting temporary exhibition to catch. So I suppose I’ve called at the Museum once or twice a year for many years now.

Well, this time there were no less than three fine exhibitions to enjoy.  First, a handsomely presented display about the archaeological finds at the very important site of Forteviot, mounted in collaboration with the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.  This really needed a visit all too itself, there was so much to take in. Then there was a selection of delectable paintings by the late William Littlejohn, this time in association with the Royal Scottish Academy, and nicely linked to a selection of prints from the Ukiyo school.  Finally, ‘Life in Miniature’ was a clever and intriguing mixed show from the Museum’s own collection. Plus, Judith hadn’t previously seen the superb permanent display of studio glass, telling the remarkable story of Monart .

Add to this the fact that the entire interior was looking fresh as paint (and maybe had indeed benefitted from some recent major redecoration), and we had a thoroughly stimulating and enjoyable experience. All by ourselves. I think we saw one other visitor the entire time we were in (which was about an hour).  Now, sadly, that’s not been an unusual experience for me at Perth Museum and Gallery.  I’ve quite often been, at best, one of just two or three visitors.

We stopped on the way out to tell the receptionist how very much we’d enjoyed our visit, and asked about the lack of visitors.  Numbers had been dropping steadily, she told us sadly.  But don’t they have lots of school trips, we asked (the displays were very well suited to provide teachers with suitable teaching material)—no, apparently not.  The costs of transport, the difficulties of getting permissions.  School trips, too, were dropping off.

We then went on to the J D Fergusson Gallery, splendidly located in the former Perth Waterworks.  The interior was looking all of its 25 years (ie rather tired), and Fergusson is not a favourite of mine—I’d have exchanged all of his paintings for the one exquisite Cadell that was also on show.  Nonetheless, again, the displays were very well presented and the staff were friendly and welcoming, but we were the only visitors.

This is surely not sustainable. But I find it hard to pin down the cause.  In my travels I’ve seen many local museums—both Council-run and independent—that are so tedious, out of date and in dire need of TLC that I’m not surprised that their visitor numbers are alarmingly low.  But that’s not the case in Perth.  Handsome and imposing buildings, in good locations, housing impressive and enjoyable displays.  What’s not to like?  Why have they become, effectively, hidden in plain sight for the people of Perth, and indeed for those visiting the city?

I can’t help contrasting our Perth experience with what we see when we visit the refurbished McManus Museum and Gallery in Dundee, which is always busy whenever we drop in.  Is it just that the McManus, like Kelvingrove in Glasgow, has a long history of ‘belonging’ to the local population, a kind of loyalty which Perth, for whatever reason, has not achieved?  Like many Scottish Councils before them, Perth and Kinross have only just outhoused their Cultural Services—including the museums– to an independent trust, Culture Perth and Kinross .  When the Highland Council set up the similar High Life Highland some years ago, that shift rejuvenated Inverness Museum and Gallery, which has to overcome the handicap of being in a truly ugly and unsuitable 60s block, so unlike the elegant classical buildings in Perth. Perhaps the advent of Culture Perth and Kinross will achieve a similar sea change, and Perth Museum and Gallery will finally be brought out of hiding.

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